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ETC at NAB 2018

ETC once again participated at this year’s NABShow (April 7-12, Las Vegas Convention Center).  Directors Yves Bergquist (AI & Neuroscience in Media), Phil Lelyveld (Immersive Media), and Seth Levenson (Adaptive Production) programmed sessions for the Next-Generation Media Technologies education track, focusing on AI and Machine Learning, Immersive Media and Cloud technology.  Our sessions were Pushing Immersive Media to the Limit – Location Based Entertainment (Monday, April 9, 11:20am – 12:00pm), Audience Genomics: Neuroscience & Machine Learning Practices to “Hack” Audience Segmentation (Tuesday, April 10, 1:30pm – 1:45pm), Content Genomics: Neuroscience & Machine Learning Practices to “Hack” Content Recommendation (Tuesday, April 10, 1:50pm – 2:50pm), and Innovation in the Cloud: Building Comprehensive Media Solutions (Wednesday, April 11, 9:00am – 9:35am).

On Sunday, April 8, prior to Monday’s official show floor opening, ETC presented in the Future of Cinema sessions:  Phil Lelyveld delivered market research data and Gen Z attitudes and behaviors in Gen Z: The YouTube Generation, and Yves Bergquist joined a panel to discuss Do Androids Dream of Making Movies?

USC Students Discuss M&E at ETC 2018

The ETC assembled a panel of seven USC undergraduate students studying various aspects of media to share their views on media at the March 22, 2018 ETC All Members Meeting.  Topics ranged from movies to TV / video, screens, and virtual reality.  Here is a 6 ½-minute highlight reel.

 

Panel:

  • Porschia Adler, Sophomore Business Administration
  • Kaitlyn Chu, Freshman Arts, Technology and the Business of Innovation
  • Caroline Kinley, Sophomore Acting
  • Dominica Ruelas, Senior Film/TV Production
  • Tara Shivkumar, Senior Writing for Screen and Television
  • Nhi Trinh, Sophomore Computational Neuroscience
  • Angela Wu, Sophomore Arts, Technology and the Business of Innovation
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Data & Analytics Project

The Storytelling Cipher: Mapping Precise Story and Character Mechanics to Box Office Returns

Our Data & Analytics Project held “The Storytelling Cipher: Mapping Stories & Characters to Box Office Revenue” Tuesday, December 6, 2016 at the USC School of Cinematic Arts.

This study leverages the Dramatic taxonomy of film narrative to infer which scene-level character and story attributes generate more box office returns, by genre. We are extending this study to ads and movie trailers.

The project researchers used machine learning to map 70+ story attributes for 300 films to their box office returns to extract which story mechanics or character features in film generated the most revenue. This was the first time granular story and character mechanics have been used to predict box office returns, which opens up many avenues to make more data-driven creative and development decisions throughout the industry.

What’s a good story? The question has been hanging without a scientific answer since the dawn of man. It seems that a story’s lack of clear mathematical structure and universal taxonomy would relegate such classification of stories to the qualitative – and highly subjective- empire of critics and … people.

Until now.

The event presented results from the research, discussed applications for the development and creative process, and outlined next steps.

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